Magazine article Marketing

Not Quite the Right Answer

Magazine article Marketing

Not Quite the Right Answer

Article excerpt

Not quite the right answer

When a media sales house like Laser Sales announces a move into direct response TV it shows that something is up. Laser Sales think it worthwhile investing a small fortune to develop voice activated technology which copes with sudden surges of enquiries -- an occupational hazard for direct response TV.

They are not the only ones taking a new interest in the medium. There are clients seeking better value for money for their media spend, and ways to measure the effectiveness of their TV ads. (Consumer goods companies like P&G, McDonalds, and Quaker Oats are reported to be experimenting with direct response TV.)

The ITV companies are keen, because it opens up new revenue earning possibilities. And direct response specialists like the US-based Interwood, have long been pushing the idea in Britain.

But if some enthusiast claims a direct response breakthrough is just around the corner for broadcasting, don't hold your breath. Just because something happens in America, it doesn't mean it will catch on in Britain. Indeed, some are trying to emulate the British. ESPN, the US sports network, for example, measure their success by the degree to which they attract |quality' ads thereby reducing reliance on the |hard-sell'. …

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