Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Vitamin C and Tuberculosis; a Neglected Chapter in Anti-Bacterial Research

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Vitamin C and Tuberculosis; a Neglected Chapter in Anti-Bacterial Research

Article excerpt

Twenty years ago, Irwin Stone unfolded his startling conclusions that vitamin C could be effective in preventing bacterial infection, in particular tuberculosis. He also presented evidence that documented its success in treating tuberculosis.

Despite impressive references, from 35 medical sources around the world, Dr. Stone's book, Vitamin C Against Disease, has been ignored in the medical literature.

Dr. Stone notes that not long after the discovery of vitamin C, enthusiasm for its use in dealing with bacterial infections was at a high level. The early workers in science laboratories had high hopes for acceptance of their discoveries.

He refers to the extensive work by investigators in large institutions and private laboratories that revealed vitamin C was an effective bactericide, an effective destroyer of most forms of tubercle bacilli. Other bacteria included Staphylococcus aureus (the pus organism), B.typhosus (the germ causing typhoid fever, B.coli (the organism from sewage), ad B.subtillis (a nonpathogenic bacterium).

Stone discovered that as little as 7,000 milligrams a day could raise the bactericidal (bacteria-killing potential) in the blood stream.

"Certain bacteria, during their growth elaborate and secrete deadly poisons or toxins," Stone says. "It has been found that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has the power to neutralize, inactivate and render harmless a wide variety of these bacterial toxins. …

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