Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Bush Proposal for No Child Left Behind Funding Falls Short of Cities' Needs

Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Bush Proposal for No Child Left Behind Funding Falls Short of Cities' Needs

Article excerpt

In a speech to commemorate the second anniversary of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), President Bush announced proposed increases for Title I funding for disadvantaged students and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

In the Fiscal Year 2005 budget proposal, to be released February 2, the President will propose increasing Title I and IDEA by $1 billion each. Though these increases are significant they fall well below the funding amount authorized by federal law.

When President Bush signed NCLB in January 2002, Republicans and Democrats promoted this legislation as the first big step in closing the achievement gap in American public education.

The law included several new accountability standards for local school districts. Also included in the law were generous funding levels to support implementation of these standards.

Weeks after signing NCLB into law, Bush released a budget that did not meet the funding commitment provided for in the law.

"The No Child Left Behind Act is a great piece of legislation which is making a difference around our country. The national objective is to challenge the soft bigotry of low expectations and to raise the standards for every single child," stated the President during a speech at West View Elementary School in Knoxville, Tenn.

Last year the President's proposed budget provided $9.7 million less than the amount authorized in NCLB, including a 40 percent cut in afterschool programs. …

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