Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Florida State Celebrates Its Integration in a Monumental Way

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Florida State Celebrates Its Integration in a Monumental Way

Article excerpt

TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

Florida State University unveiled a larger-than-life bronze sculpture last month to pay tribute to the first African American students who integrated the university more than 40 years ago.

The sculpture, called "Integration," was dedicated during the university's Heritage Day celebration. It is located in the heart of the campus on the new Woodward Plaza.

"We commissioned this statue to recognize our past and celebrate our future," said FSU President T.K. Wetherell. "Thanks to the courageous efforts of our first African American students, the student body looks different today than when I was a student here in the '60s, and I'm proud of that. Part of what makes this university great is its rich diversity, and we are committed to ensuring a learning environment that reflects all of the people of our state."

Alumni who graduated between 1964 and 1974 joined faculty, staff and students for the dedication ceremony. They also were invited to share their memories of this period of the university's history for a video history project.

The statue, created by renowed sculptor W. Stanley "Sandy" Proctor, depicts three individuals who achieved goals of academic, athletic and social integration: Maxwell Courtney, the first African American to graduate from FSU; Fred Flowers, the first African American to wear an FSU athletic uniform; and Doby Flowers, FSU's first African American homecoming princess. …

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