Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Counseling on Exercise Should Become Routine in Psychiatry

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Counseling on Exercise Should Become Routine in Psychiatry

Article excerpt

BOSTON -- Exercise counseling should be part of routine psychiatric practice, Dr. Alison C. Phillips advised at the American Psychiatric Association's Institute on Psychiatric Services.

Physical activity is particularly important for psychiatric patients. Not only do the vast majority of psychotropic medications potentially cause weight gain, but mood and anxiety disorders often are associated with low energy and decreased motivation to eat well. But despite a large body of literature suggesting improvements in depression and anxiety with regular aerobic exercise--above and beyond its vast general medical benefit--such counseling has not been incorporated into routine psychiatry practice, noted Dr. Phillips of the Hestia Institute, Wellesley, Mass.

"Psychiatrists should be involved in exercise counseling. We typically see patients more frequently and for longer periods of time than any other medical specialty, allowing for frequent reinforcement and monitoring. And we have special training in counseling people to change behavior. Moreover, not counseling the benefits of exercise may be perceived as condoning a sedentary lifestyle," she remarked.

Although most of the data on improvements in mental health from exercise are derived from nonclinical populations, the overall positive trend is consistent for both depression and anxiety, and also for both aerobic and strength/flexibility training. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.