Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Make Sleep Screening Routine after TBIs

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Make Sleep Screening Routine after TBIs

Article excerpt

CHICAGO -- Children with traumatic brain injuries have greater reported sleep problems than do children with orthopedic injuries, suggesting the need for routine sleep screening after brain injuries, said Dr. Clifford Askinazi and his colleagues at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

The sleep problems those children reported included daytime sleepiness, nightmares, excessive sleeping, and difficulty sleeping, the researchers reported in a poster session at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. The problems in the children with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) were evident by 6 months after injury, peaked after 1 year, and were still evident 4 years post injury, they said.

As part of a larger study of neuropsychological and family system outcomes after pediatric TBI, the researchers looked at 109 children with moderate to severe TBIs and 79 children with orthopedic injuries without brain involvement.

Parents rated their children's behaviors at baseline and at 6, 12, and 48 months post injury using seven items from the Child Behavior Checklist: trouble sleeping, nightmares, overtired, sleeps more than most children, sleeps less than most children, wets the bed, and talks or walks in sleep. …

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