Magazine article Technology & Learning

DataBaseball - a Classroom Hit!

Magazine article Technology & Learning

DataBaseball - a Classroom Hit!

Article excerpt

It's the bottom of the ninth. The bases are loaded, the count is three and two, and the fans are going wild. The pitcher checks the catcher's sign, he winds up, he pitches, the batter swings...

Basedball, America's sport, is a pastime that spans generations and appeals to males and females alike. Mark Jacobs, eighth-grade teacher in Pomona, NY, was convinced that by building a computerized activity around this topic, he could bring meaning and excitement to the process of creating and using a database.

The materials Jacobs used for this DataBaseball game were a simple database manager, a Stratomatic baseball game (available at hobby shops, baseball card conventions, or by mail order), bingo chips, a pair of dice, and the gameboard printout shown here.

Here began by creating a database with his class containing the fields the students agreed were important for storing information about baseball players (fields such as batting average and times at bat).

Jacobs then divided his students into small groups, assigned each group a baseball team and gave out the Stratomatic cards for that team's players. Using the personal data provided on the cards (At Bats, Doubles, Homeruns, etc.), a students filled in the agreed-upon information about each player. Then, in 11 numbered fields (#2 through #12), created especially for that purpose, they entered game information from the first column on the Stratomatic card. (In a sample Stratomatic column, line 2 might read STRIKEOUT, line 3 HOMERUN, line 4 DOUBLE, and so on. …

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