Magazine article UN Chronicle

Rights of Older Persons Backed by Economic and Social Council. Acts on Human Rights, Women, Drugs, and Other Social Issues

Magazine article UN Chronicle

Rights of Older Persons Backed by Economic and Social Council. Acts on Human Rights, Women, Drugs, and Other Social Issues

Article excerpt

Older persons have the right to make decisions about their care and quality of life, and should be able to reside at home as long as possible and remain integrated in society, according to a draft set of Principles for Older Persons, recommended for adoption by the General Assembly.

In a resolution adopted by the Economic and Social Council at its first regular session of 1991 (13-31 May and 17-21 June, New York), Governments will be asked to incorporate the Principles to their national programmes. The Principles are based on the International Plan of Action on Ageing, adopted by the World Assembly on Ageing convened by the UN in Vienna in 1982.

The Council adopted 109 texts49 resolutions and 60 decisions-at the session. Many had been recommended by its subsidiary bodies, including the Commission on Human Rights, the Commission for Social Development, the Commission on the Status of Women and the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

Among its actions, the Council called on all Governments and organizations to maintain sanctions against South Africa until the total dismantlement of the apartheid system. The resolution was adopted by a vote of 36 to 16, with no abstentions.

All parties engaged in negotiations for a post-apartheid society in South Africa were urged to ensure that the principle of equality between women and men was incorporated in all laws and institutions.

By a separate text, the Council reaffirmed the importance of achieving the objectives of the Second Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination and asked the South African Government to exercise its responsibility to end violence in that country.

In other human rights action, it decided to submit to the Assembly a draft body of principles for the protection of persons with mental illness and for the improvement of mental health care.

By 19 votes to 11, with 23 abstentions, it asked for a Special Representative on the situation of human rights in Cuba. Rafael Rivas Posada, a Colombian diplomat, was subsequently named to the post to "maintain direct contact with the Government and citizens of Cuba" on human rights issues.

The Council also endorsed the appointment of Fatma Zohra Ksentini as Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.