Magazine article Marketing

Fooled by Attractive Images

Magazine article Marketing

Fooled by Attractive Images

Article excerpt

A rash of management books has recently been published which carry public health warnings about smilers. We're being told that too many employers appoint pleasant smiling people into jobs which could better be performed by repulsive scowlers. Too many clients appoint ad agencies or accountancy firms on the basis of social comfort, rather than choosing a team -- however physically repellant and odious -- which has the technical competence required to do the job.

That's one view. The other is you need to have attractive looking teams to succeed. In business circles 55% of impact is still based on appearance, 38% on how people speak and their overall confidence, and a miserly 7% on what they actually say. Psychologist Leonard Zunin has estimated that it takes just four minutes for people to weigh each other up and decide whether or not to develop friendships. Appearance is now so important that in Texas a small proportion of the $22m a year spent on rehabilitating offenders actually goes on plastic surgery. At first this was as a reward for good behaviour--now it is directed at the most needy.

Which of these two views is correct? We should be told. Because I fear for the legions of uglies about to undergo the surgeon's knife only to find that their new found attractiveness disbars them from ultimate business success and happiness.

Facing up to the ugly truth

Has Japan done so well because its business leaders and wrestlers are so much better looking than the Europeans? Will the best looking political party win the next election or not? Should John major smile more -- or less? …

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