Magazine article Security Management

Cybercrime-Fighting Tools Still Lacking

Magazine article Security Management

Cybercrime-Fighting Tools Still Lacking

Article excerpt

Information-security trade shows abound with products promising to solve any cybersecurity problem from blocking hackers to tracking malicious insiders. But most of these vendors are aiming their products at IT professionals, not law enforcement investigators charged with fighting incidents of cybercrime.

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To help bridge the chasm between commercial infosec products and those needed to fight cybercrime, the Institute for Security Technology Studies (ISTS), a Dartmouth College think-tank, has released the Gap Analysis Report, a paper that looks at the needs of investigators and maps them against available software tools. It analyzes these needs and looks at more than 200 existing and in-development products to see what is missing.

The report is the second of three ISTS papers on this subject. The first was a national needs assessment that examined the types of challenges that cyberinvestigators face and the kinds of tools they need. (See "Wanted: Tools, Expertise to Fight Cybercrime," "Tech Talk," September 2002.) The third report, Research and Development Agenda, is slated for release later this year. Data for the reports comes from national surveys, law enforcement interviews, and ISTS-led workshops.

In the case of the Gap Analysis Report, researchers created a list of existing tools and their functions and presented it to a prioritization working group comprising investigators from the public, private, and academic sectors. This group was asked to vet the list of technology solutions to see whether it was complete and whether existing needs were addressed by these solutions. …

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