Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Education Group Puts Spotlight on Dropout Prevention Programs

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Education Group Puts Spotlight on Dropout Prevention Programs

Article excerpt

BOSTON

Taking aim at the "hidden, national crisis" that consigns nearly five million out-of-school and unemployed young adults to a future locked out of education and family-supporting jobs, Jobs for the Future (JFF), a Boston-based education advocacy group, has called on policy-makers and educators around the country to get behind a diversity of educational dropout prevention programs that successfully connect out-of-school youth with education and put them on a path to further study and solid employment.

In "From the Prison Track to the College Track," JFF reports on four types of new school programs that effectively move low-income, out-of-school youth, ages 16-24, toward completing high school and postsecondary education and training, and gaining access to real employment opportunities. The programs make school success possible for young people whom the traditional system has failed.

"As a society and as a nation, we must make a commitment to these youth, using the best tools possible to connect them with education and future employment," said Hilary Pennington, JFF's chief executive officer. "A more positive future is important for them, but it's also important for us all, because these young adults are a big part of our future work force. We cannot squander their energies and their talents."

The report notes that for every 100 students who enter 9th grade, only 67 graduate from high school; just 38 go on to college; and only 18 of the original 100 wind up getting an associate's or bachelor's degree. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.