Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Teens Gaining Weight Faster Than Parents

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Teens Gaining Weight Faster Than Parents

Article excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO -- Today's teens are not only heavier than their parents, they're also gaining weight at more than twice the rate of their parents, according to a poster presented by Dr. Patricia H. Davis at a conference on cardiovascular disease epidemiology and prevention sponsored by the American Heart Association.

The study demonstrated that total cholesterol and blood pressure are more strongly correlated with obesity in today's teenagers than in the past, said Dr. Davis of the University of Iowa, Iowa City.

The investigators examined data from 518 children in Muscatine, Iowa, aged 15-18 years, who had their body mass indexes (BMIs) measured between 1971 and 1981. They compared these results with new data from 228 of their offspring who were the same ages when their BMIs were measured from 2001 to 2003.

The average BMI of boys rose from 22.97 kg/[m.sup.2] to 24.24 kg/[m.sup.2] from the earlier to the later period, and the average body mass index of girls rose from 21. …

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