Magazine article Occupational Hazards

AIHce: Infectious Diseases Prove Big Threat in Small World

Magazine article Occupational Hazards

AIHce: Infectious Diseases Prove Big Threat in Small World

Article excerpt

SARS, West Nile Virus and other infectious diseases have brought a renewed appreciation for the need to be prepared to respond rapidly to outbreaks on a global scale, a physician from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), warned attendees at the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Expo (AIHce) on May 12.

Dr. James Hughes, director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases, noted that of the 57 million deaths worldwide in 2002, about a quarter were caused by infectious diseases. The top five infectious causes of death were lower respiratory tract infections such as influenza and pneumonia (3.8 million), HIV/AIDs (2.8 million), diarrhea (1.8 million), tuberculosis (1.6 million) and malaria (1.2 million). Hughes noted that one feature of these five leading killers is a "propensity to acquire drug resistance."

"Infectious disease outbreaks are increasingly recognized to impact on national security and the global economy," said Hughes. "Local outbreaks and problems are recognized to have much wider implications and rapid and collaborative response are much better appreciated as being essential and, in fact, are expected."

Among the factors cited in a 1992 report, "Emerging Infections," that have contributed to new infectious disease outbreaks, Hughes noted, are changes in demographics and behavior, technological and industrial changes, economic development and changes in land use patterns, the growth of international travel, microbial adaptation and change, and breakdowns in public health measures. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.