Magazine article Sunset

Shed Revival

Magazine article Sunset

Shed Revival

Article excerpt

Evan Sagerman and Marci Riseman needed extra space for a guest room and entertaining area, and they found it in an unlikely place: a tiny, ramshackle shed in the backyard of their San Francisco Victorian home. Even Riseman, a real estate consultant and developer, didn't see potential in the neglected, 280-square-foot structure. "My first thought was: That's a teardown," she says.

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But when she and Sagerman, an architect, gave the shed a closer look, they reconsidered. "We think it was used by day laborers in the early 1900s," Sagerman says. Placement of doors and windows indicated that the space had once been divided into four tiny rooms, and it had a sewer line. "But it was a sturdy structure made out of good redwood," he adds.

The couple decided to remodel the shed, and it became an exercise in preservation and space planning. They looked to boat cabins for design inspiration. "I grew up sailing," Sagerman says. "Being on boats taught me how important it is to give things in small spaces multiple functions."

The interior of the shed has a clean, open layout. "You move through it in a straight line, with the bed as a stop at one end and the bathroom as a stop at the other," Sagerman says. …

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