Magazine article Technology & Learning

Multimedia Computing for Today's Schools

Magazine article Technology & Learning

Multimedia Computing for Today's Schools

Article excerpt

Multimedia - what is it and why are educators so excited about it? In today's world, the term multimedia is increasingly being used to refer to the marriage of computer-style interactivity with the multisensory capabilities of television or film. A number of the components that make up multimedia have for years served educators well in the classroom. Creative teachers have used audio recordings, filmstrips, slides, and movies to capture student attention and illustrate hard-to-explain concepts. They've incorporated educational television into the curriculum because of its ability to bring meaning to a variety of subjects in a style that is both familiar and appealing to young people. And they've discovered the overwhelming power and appeal of computers when placed in the hands of students.

In recent years, the challenge and the dream of those immersed in educational technology has been to bring these successful tools together into a single multimedia environment. We've seen a progression from multi-station classrooms (where, for example, students view films, read books, and work with computer software all related to a single theme) to setups that involve hooking together separate components (for example, a videodisc player, a video monitor, and a complete computer system).

But, for many leaders in the field of educational technology, the goal has been to go one step further - to produce a "seamless" environment in which photographic images, video footage, music, and speech are all processed by the computer in the same manner as text and other data. In such an environment the end-user would easily be able to call up footage of a particular phenomenon or event, jump to an accompanying written description, click on a word within that description to hear it pronounced, link to a related image, listen to spoken narration, and so on.

Enter the Multimedia PC. It is not a totally new machine. Instead, it is an MS-DOS computer that conforms to a new base-level PC standard. It is equipped with a hard disk, a fast microprocessor, a high-performance graphics card and plenty of memory (see the chart on page 8 for the exact specifications), allowing it to run a full range of existing MS-DOS titles, including those that offer state-of-the-art graphics and animation.

The Multimedia PC also includes a CD-ROM drive, providing users with access to huge quantities of data in the form of text, images, and high-quality recorded sound - all stored in digital format easily processed by the computer. In addition, it is equipped with a special audio system that is compatible with the most popular sound cards already on the market but capable of much more. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.