Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Super-Exclusive Bar That Is Open to All, in the Heart of London's West End

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Super-Exclusive Bar That Is Open to All, in the Heart of London's West End

Article excerpt

If there's an idea that really appeals to me, it's of the bar that feels like a private club, but is actually open to all. There's an undeniable romance about the little tucked-away place, known to a chosen few, that boasts exceptional cocktails and the kind of staff who have your cigarette lit before you knew you wanted one. On the other hand, although I'm no expert on members-only establishments, in my experience, the thrill of getting through the door is often the best part of the evening. The truth is that private joints tend to be a bit smug, and beneath the surface smuggery is usually more than a frisson of status anxiety. You can never relax, because everyone is checking out everyone else while desperately trying not to. Obviously, if I were an A-list celebrity I wouldn't go anywhere but Harry's Bar (who wants to be pestered for autographs all night?), but as I'm not, I would rather find a place that has all the advantages of a members-only establishment without the "elite" clientele.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Which brings me to Milk and Honey, a bar in the heart of London's West End (Poland Street, to be precise) that has managed to pull off the trick of being super-exclusive and, at the same time, open to all. In the first place, it is impossible to find (no door number; only an intimidating all-black frontage next to a pub). Second, it actually is members-only from 11pm on, and before the witching hour non-members are required to make reservations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.