Magazine article Corrections Today

National Association of Juvenile Correctional Agencies Celebrates 100 Years

Magazine article Corrections Today

National Association of Juvenile Correctional Agencies Celebrates 100 Years

Article excerpt

The National Association of Juvenile Correctional Agencies is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. Although the organization did not officially meet until 1904, the early members had their conceptual meeting at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in Atlanta in May 1903. During its first meeting on June 13, 1904, in Portland, Maine, the members chose as the organization's first name, The National Conference on the Education of Backward, Truant, Dependent and Delinquent Children.

The following chronology lists major events in the life of the association, taken from its former president Jack C. Pulliam's publication Through the Years.

1903 During a meeting of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in Atlanta, May 6-21, a committee comprising people primarily interested in juvenile problems conducts a thorough canvass of the field that results in the establishment of the National Conference on the Education of Backward, Truant and Delinquent Children.

1904 The first meeting of the new organization is held June 13, in the vestry room of the Chestnut Street Church in Portland, Maine. The group votes to become an affiliate of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections. The association's name is changed to add the word "dependent," becoming The National Conference on the Education of Backward, Truant, Dependent and Delinquent Children.

1911 The association begins a joint meeting with the National Probation Association.

1914 The association decides to include the American Association of Officials of Charities and Corrections in joint meetings.

1919 The association's involvement with the U.S. Children's Bureau begins with an address by Katherine F. Lenroot of the bureau's Social Services Division in Washington, D.C.

1921 At a meeting in Jacksonville, Fla., Oct. 25-28, the National Conference on the Education of Backward, Truant, Dependent and Delinquent Children and the Juvenile Reformatory Section of the American Prison Association, combine to create the National Conference of Juvenile Agencies.

1922 A committee meets in New York City March 29 to draft a statement of purposes for the new organization and to prepare a constitution, which is adopted at the 1923 meeting. The National Conference of Juvenile Agencies meets in Detroit, Oct. 12-18, concurrently with the American Prison Congress.

1924 Roy McLauglin of Rhode Island asks to go on record that "We are not juvenile jails or prisons, but we are educational institutions, first and last."

1925 The National Conference of Juvenile Agencies endorses indeterminate sentences for all juveniles committed to correctional institutions.

1929 The National Conference of Juvenile Agencies meets outside the United States for the first time in Toronto, Sept. 18-20.

1936 A conference is held Sept. 11-15 in Chicago. At the business meeting, the majority of the membership present votes to cease meeting with the American Prison Association and instead meet with the National Conference on Social Work. Attendees also vote to change the organization's name from the National Conference of Juvenile Agencies to the National Association of Training Schools.

1940 The association adopts a resolution asking the American Prison Association and its affiliates to consider changing the name of its annual conference from Prison Congress to Congress of Correction to indicate a broader focus.

1942 The first meeting of the Congress of Correction is held in Asheville, N.C., Oct. 19-22.

1943 Edward L. Johnstone, secretary-treasurer of the National Association of Training Schools, writes a 24-page history of the first 40 years of the association.

1944 States are urged by the association to enact legislation prohibiting the detention of juvenile offenders in jails or similar institutions.

1952 The Juvenile Delinquency Project is developed as a division of the U. …

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