Magazine article Ebony

Power Exercises

Magazine article Ebony

Power Exercises

Article excerpt

FOR superbusy executives who occupy lofty positions in corporate America and at non-profit civil rights organizations, time is money. Consequently, they find it especially difficult to work a regular fitness routine into their hectic schedules filled with high-level meetings, constant travel and a steady stream of breakfast meetings, power lunches and banquet dinners.

Yet, the stress and ever-pressing demands from jobs and families make a regular fitness regimen even more important for people in powerful positions. Medical experts as well as executives themselves emphasize that regular workouts are essential to staying physically fit and mentally alert.

"The type of job I have is very stressful," says Chicagoan Elynor A. Williams, vice president of public responsibility for the Sara Lee Corp. "Exercise is great for attitude adjustments; it is better than cocktails. Working out is a win-win situation, and anyone who has ever been in an executive position knows the benefits of regular exercise. It is wonderful to start your day on a very high note."

John E. Jacob agrees. As president and chief executive officer of the National Urban League, Jacob is personally acquainted with stress. And, consequently, he says he gets his most rigorous workouts by running to catch airplanes and from one meeting to another. However, Jacob does find time occasionally to play tennis and golf, though not nearly as much as he would like to.

Echoing Jacob's sentiment is Dr. …

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