Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Riley House Receives Collection of Abolitionist Papers

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Riley House Receives Collection of Abolitionist Papers

Article excerpt

TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

The John G. Riley Center/ Museum of African American History and Culture formally received a nationally significant collection of Black abolitionist papers last month at Tallahassee Community College Library.

The collection, which will be housed at Tallahassee Community College (TCC), contains documents including editorials, sermons, speeches, letters and essays written by African Americans involved in the movement to end slavery in the United States.

"The role of Black Americans in the anti-slavery crusade has been a neglected area in American history, largely because of the unavailability of research materials," said Riley House director Althemese Barnes. "That is what makes this collection so valuable."

Receiving the over 14,000-piece collection was TCC President Bill Law, TCC history and social science dean Dr. Monte Finkelstein, TCC director of library services Cherry Alexander, Anthony Dixon, a Riley Archive intern, and Barnes.

"Having the Black Abolitionist Papers on campus will provide students the opportunity to gain a fuller understanding of the antislavery movement," said Finkelstein. "It is important in the context of ante bellum American culture and society and the role that Black Americans, some of whom are well known and others who are more obscure, played in bringing an end to slavery in the United States."

The partnership between the John Gilmore Riley African American Museum and Archives and Tallahassee Community College was established in August 2003. …

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