Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Study Leading Some Experts to Question the Existence of 'Second-Impact Syndrome'

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Study Leading Some Experts to Question the Existence of 'Second-Impact Syndrome'

Article excerpt

MONTEREY, CALIF. -- The so-called "second-impact syndrome" may not actually exist, Dr. Greg Landry said at a meeting on pediatric and adolescent sports medicine sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The term was coined by R.C. Schneider in 1973 to describe cases in which athletes sustained a head injury on the field, returned to play before full recovery, and then experienced a second head injury and died.

It is most commonly associated with football, but second-impact syndrome (SIS) can occur in any sport (Clin. Sports Med. 17[1]:37-44, 1998).

Some current concussion management guidelines are based on preventing SIS.

"The whole phenomenon is scary: It's something I think all of us worry about when we cover a game." Some experts, however, suggest that there is no such entity as SIS. The deaths associated with SIS are due to the cerebral edema that usually results from repeated head trauma, said Dr. Landry, professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. …

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