Magazine article Security Management

Home on the Page @ WWW.Securitymanagement.Com

Magazine article Security Management

Home on the Page @ WWW.Securitymanagement.Com

Article excerpt

Every month, readers from all over the world send Security Management Online words of thanks for the quality and quantity of security information on the site, calling it an unmatched resource. If you have not experienced the wonders of this Web site firsthand, find out what they're raving about. The site archives articles and columns, links to important reports and testimonies, updates pending legislation, allows quick searches by topic area, and does much more. One small part of that array is this column, whose links can be found in "Beyond Print." Here's some of what's new online this month.

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Port security. According to intelligence reports, Islamic extremists continue to express interest in attacking New York, the Western world's economic hub. One choice target might be the Port of New York and New Jersey, which a recent report by the Stevens Institute of Technology has called "still very vulnerable." Shortcomings include the lack of integrated plans for prevention and response, the absence of a cyber backbone to link stake-holders with secure communications, and an inability to respond to multiple events. Reflecting the views of more than 60 specialists and "informed observers," the report makes a series of recommendations, including developing a "network-centric" approach to information and operations, creating a body to oversee this approach, and conducting "confidential workshops for developing resources and providing coordination in the face of diversionary and simultaneous attacks." SM Online takes you to the full report.

Crime against tourists. Police in New Orleans and Orlando have created special units dedicated to protecting tourists. Officers are trained to be sociable with tourists, and the units are allied with tourism associations and organizations, according to a new problem-oriented-policing guide on tourist crime developed by the U.S. Department of Justice. Hotels and other sectors of the tourism industry in those cities are strongly encouraged to perform background checks on employees, and police urge that these staff members be heavily punished if found guilty of crime against tourists. Other jurisdictions make it easier for victimized tourists to testify against criminals; Hawaii, for example, has enacted a statute allowing victims to testify from their homes via teleconferencing. Various other measures are in use around the United States, such as creating business-improvement districts in downtown areas, and encouraging hotels to adopt practices to reduce guest victimization, including requiring guests to show identification before entering the building. Disney World uses crime prevention through environmental design techniques to protect visitors. "Virtually every pool, fountain, and flower garden serves both as a visual attraction and a means to direct visitors away from, or toward, particular locations," the guide says. The document is on SM Online.

Money laundering. A global anti-money-laundering survey conducted by KPMG suggests that money laundering has captured bank executives' attention because of potential impact on profits. Anti-money-laundering (AML) "has become a key issue for senior management because the possibility of an AML-related failure now poses significant potential reputational risk, both domestically and for banks' international operations," says the report. …

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