Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Critics Question Ward Connerly's Pay Package

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Critics Question Ward Connerly's Pay Package

Article excerpt

LANSING, MICH.

Critics of a planned 2006 ballot initiative that would ban affirmative action in government hiring and college admissions in Michigan are questioning whether the petition drive's leader violated tax regulations.

Documents filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) show Ward Connerly as paid more than $1 million by his two tax-exempt nonprofit groups last year. IRS rules prohibit excessive pay to officers of such charities.

"This large percentage of a nonprofit operation going to the pockets of one person raises some very serious questions," David Waymire, spokesman for a Connerly opposition coalition called Citizens for a United Michigan, told The Detroit News.

"The IRS doesn't allow you to set up a tax-exempt organization to personally enrich yourself, and it looks to us like that's what he's doing," said Waymire, whose organization includes the NAACP, AFL-CIO, Michigan Catholic Conference and several state businesses.

The News said Connerly did not return several phone calls to his Sacramento office. …

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