Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Media Exposure Not Always Helpful

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Media Exposure Not Always Helpful

Article excerpt

EXPOSURE ON THE airwaves and in the press does not necessarily help a presidential candidate.

Although 33 % of respondents said they had heard the most about independent candidate Ross Perot in newspapers and on television and radio, 17% of them said they had come to have a less favorable opinion of him in the past few days, according to a survey from the Times Mirror Center for the People & the Press.

(The survey was taken before the first presidential debate in which Perot's popularity in the polls rose slightly. )

Being the incumbent also apparently does not mean increased coverage, either, as only 18% of respondents said they had seen the most coverage for President Bush, and 12% of them said they had developed a less favorable opinion. Only 3% said they had a more favorable opinion.

Democratic contender Bill Clinton scored 33% among people asked the same question about coverage, with both those acquiring a more favorable opinion of the Arkansas governor and those with a less favorable opinion registering at 9%.

Interestingly, in the week before Perot announced that he would be rejoining the race, 40% of respondents said they had seen the most coverage for Clinton; 29%, Bush; and 19%, Perot 14%. …

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