Magazine article Metro Magazine

New Stones, Please: The Glass House

Magazine article Metro Magazine

New Stones, Please: The Glass House

Article excerpt

The most important thing I realized while thinking about The Glass H ouse is that it isn't really television at all--it's breakfast radio with pictures. Of course the presence of dawn patrol veterans Wil Anderson and Dave Hughes highlights this similarity, but it's the style rather than the panellists that betrays The Glass House formula. The remorseless energy, the strip-mining of newspapers for comedy, and the classic line-up of two guys plus token girl is indistinguishable from its FM brethren, and arguably as entertaining. If you're feeling lenient, the show also serves exactly the same role, in that its spontaneity and ebullience provide relaxing, throwaway entertainment. The only difference is that Wil, Corrine and Dave ease you out of the working week rather than ease you in.

Unfortunately, just as so many morning DJs are funny and annoying in equal measure, so too is The Glass House. It is frequently puerile, self-indulgent, and relies on comedic sitting ducks rather than genuine wit. The footage of politicians taken out of context is a particularly laboured example of this tendency, and Wil jabs at Christians and John Howard with wearying consistency. Of course it can be argued that a comedian must take their laughs where they can get them, but when they clearly can't be bothered looking in more than one place, they've only themselves to blame for stale material.

Couple this repetitive comedic approach with a familiar rota of like-minded guests, and it's hard to dispel the air of smugness that cripples even the best panel shows. …

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