Magazine article Geographical

The Exceeding Small Apple: Map of New Amsterdam, New Netherlands (1660)

Magazine article Geographical

The Exceeding Small Apple: Map of New Amsterdam, New Netherlands (1660)

Article excerpt

Founded in 1624 by Dutch settlers, New Amsterdam was the capital of the larger colony of New Netherlands, located on an island off the northeast coast of North America. The frontier town was a pretty wild place, plagued by confrontations with hostile natives and drunken brawls.

The colony's affairs were controlled by the newly created Dutch West India Company. Its director, Peter Minuit, had purchased the island from the local tribes for goods worth 60 guilders, the equivalent of a few hundred pounds.

However, the gradual breakdown of law and order saw the government in Holland send over a new director-general by the name of Peter Stuyvesant to oversee the colony. Stuyvesant greatly expanded the fledgling settlement, but he became extremely unpopular when he banned alcohol, curtailed religious freedoms and oppressed minorities.

Hence, the bloodless takeover of New Amsterdam by the British in 1664 was greeted with some relief by its inhabitants. It was then that the colony took on the name by which it's now known--New York--after Charles II's brother James, the Duke of York and Albany.

This plan is the result of a survey made during the summer of 1660 by Jacques Cortelyou--the surveyor-general to the Dutch West India Company from January 1657--and was the third of four performed by him between 1657 and 1661. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.