Magazine article Guitar Player

Blues Guru: Robben Ford: A New Shade of Blue

Magazine article Guitar Player

Blues Guru: Robben Ford: A New Shade of Blue

Article excerpt

Here's a sound--a color--that I really enjoy throwing into a blues in G: the intriguing chord known as G13[FLAT]9 [Ex. 1]. You don't have to play this chord with the root, but to get a complete sense of the harmony-especially if there's no bass player holding down the tonic--you can fret the root by putting your thumb on the lowest string at the 3rd fret as shown. A simple example of how you can bring out this harmony in a G blues solo would be a lick like this [Ex. 2]. This phrase comes straight out of the G half/whole symmetrical scale [Ex. 3]. G13[flat]9 is just a prize chord for this scale, because the scale tags every note in the chord perfectly.

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

I'd like to point out that while the technical name of this chord is G13[flat]9, I really don't think of it that way. To me, it's an E triad superimposed over G7. See the perfect E triad in the chord? …

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