Magazine article Newsweek

A Major League Mess; Nobody Looked Good as Congress Spent a Long Day Grilling Players and Executives about Baseball's Steroid Problems and Policies. Can't Anybody Here Save This Game?

Magazine article Newsweek

A Major League Mess; Nobody Looked Good as Congress Spent a Long Day Grilling Players and Executives about Baseball's Steroid Problems and Policies. Can't Anybody Here Save This Game?

Article excerpt

Byline: Mark Starr and Eve Conant

There's supposed to be no crying in baseball. But there was Mark McGwire in Washington last week, fighting back tears, his voice choked with emotion, telling a congressional committee investigating steroid use in baseball how he, well, couldn't really tell them much. "My lawyers have advised me that I cannot answer these questions without jeopardizing my friends, my family or myself," said the retired superstar, whose 70 home runs in 1998 shattered one of baseball's most hallowed records.

Through a long, uncomfortable afternoon before the House Government Reform Committee, McGwire was never forced to literally invoke his rights under the Fifth Amendment. But he did refuse to answer any questions about illegal or even legal drugs and, in the end, about almost anything at all. His sullen, resentful and at times combative style won him few friends--inside or outside the hearing room--as he repeatedly insisted, "I'm not here to talk about the past." The only other player to indicate he might not answer some questions was baseball's No. 1 pariah, Jose Canseco. McGwire's stance became even more conspicuous when three other sluggers, Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro and Frank Thomas, all denied--unequivocally and under oath--having used steroids. "I have never used steroids, period!" said Palmeiro.

If it was a bad day for the players--McGwire's performance could disrupt what should have been a cakewalk into the Hall of Fame--it was no less ugly for baseball's brass. During the course of the 11-hour hearing, Major League Baseball was derided like some street gang for its "code of silence" and had its testimony critiqued as "theater of the absurd." Connecticut Republican Christopher Shays said baseball's "arrogance" in resisting the inquiry had produced more bipartisanship than he had experienced in 18 years in Congress.

Though baseball's leaders were unfailingly polite and attentive, none of the outrage and distrust evidenced by committee members seemed to make much of a visible impression on them. MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and the rest remained steadfast in a trifecta of views that would seem both improbable and impossible to reconcile: that they weren't aware of a steroid problem in the '90s; that the problem was never as big as some, like Canseco, have made it out to be, and that baseball's testing program has made huge progress in combating its steroid problem.

The Olympics and other major pro sports leagues long ago implemented policies that, at least, mirrored public concerns about the use of performance-enhancing drugs, but baseball has lagged far behind. Now it has implemented a new drug-testing policy that, while tougher than its predecessor, remains conspicuously weaker than that of other leagues. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.