Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Colleges Have Mixed Reactions to Workforce Reforms

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Colleges Have Mixed Reactions to Workforce Reforms

Article excerpt

Would pending legislation make Workforce Investment Act programs a bigger boon for community colleges? A bill being debated in the Senate would create a special role for community colleges and knock out some red tape that has limited community college participation in federally funded job training. The House has approved the Job Training Improvement Act of 2005, which is now being considered in the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions.

The House Education and the Workforce Committee acknowledged that "current eligible training provider provisions include requirements that have proven to be overly burdensome" to community colleges faced with mountains of data to collect and forms to fill out. One major imposition: colleges had to file data on all students in training programs, not just those getting WIA funding. Congress had intended to create a list of eligible training providers so workers getting services could choose schools. But the idea backfired when institutions wouldn't participate or limited the number of WIA students they took because of all the trouble.

The legislation would leave it up to states to set requirements for trainers and reporting. But states would have to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act when setting their criteria.

The Job Training Improvement Act would create a $250 million community-based job-training demonstration project to provide education and training and place graduates in jobs through one-stop delivery systems. Only community colleges could get the grants. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.