Magazine article USA TODAY

How Cocaine Use Affects Violence

Magazine article USA TODAY

How Cocaine Use Affects Violence

Article excerpt

Contrary to earlier findings, research reveals that there is little connection between the way drug users ingest cocaine--by smoking, injecting, or snorting--and their levels of violent behavior. "Most of the previous studies showed that the more intense the form of cocaine used, the more the violence was displayed. However, much to our surprise, our study showed that the form of cocaine doesn't mean very much," reports A. James Giannini, professor of clinical psychiatry, Ohio State University. He worked with Norman S. Miller, assistant professor of psychiatry, Cornell University Medical College; Robert Loiselle, profess of psychology in psychiatry, Northeastern Ohio Universities' College of Medicine; and Carlton E. Turner, president, Princeton Diagnostic Laboratories of America. They did find a connection between the form of cocaine ingestion and "spur of the moment" violence, such as hitting objects or people. Yet, there was no connection at all between the route of cocaine administration and premeditated violence, such as armed robbery or rape.

The researchers evaluated 101 men and women who came to mental health outpatient centers for treatment of cocaine addiction. …

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