Magazine article District Administration

Ed Leaders Talk Tech

Magazine article District Administration

Ed Leaders Talk Tech

Article excerpt

Unless every student is given his or her own computer in school, districts can't even be close to transforming education, according to one expert.

Seymour Papert, professor emeritus of MIT Media Lab, told an audience at the Consortium for School Networking's 10th Annual Networking Conference in Washington, D.C. recently that three conditions are needed for transformation: Recognize that districts have not transformed; recognize that when districts talk of access it's inflated; and recognize that districts must explore ideas of what should be learned at what age. "All our ideas about what children can learn at particular ages is based on experience in a pencil-and-paper kind of learning environment," Papert says.

More than 800 educators, from technology directors to superintendents, gathered at the conference to discuss how some districts are starting to transform education and how technology can be used to help schools meet the demands of the 21st century. "Some people say, 'This generation can't focus,'" says Chris Dede, professor of learning technologies at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. "What I see is very sophisticated use.... We expose them to deep academic skills but it's so out of touch with their learning styles."

Dede adds that technology spending in districts is off the front burner, with a "been there, done that" mentality. "Our challenge is to help people see that technology is a part of the change" that is necessary to transform education. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.