Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Harold Cruse, 1916-2005: Social Critic, Founding Director of University of Michigan's Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Harold Cruse, 1916-2005: Social Critic, Founding Director of University of Michigan's Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Article excerpt

Harold Cruse, renowned social critic, essayist and founding director of the University of Michigan's Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, died March 25 in Ann Arbor, Mich. He was 89.

Considered to be one of the leading Black public intellectuals of the 20th century, Cruse was best known for his book The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual. He was first named program director of Michigan's Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS) in 1969, then acting director in 1971 and director from 1972-1973. Reportedly, he was one of the first African-Americans without a college degree to get tenure at a major university.

A New Yorker reviewer wrote at the time that The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, which was published in 1967, "will infuriate almost everyone." Exploring issues of social justice and equality through his writing, Cruse went on to write several other books, including Plural but Equal, which criticized the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

"As it was implemented in the South," Cruse wrote, "the Brown decision eliminated Black teachers, Black principals, Black administrators, a whole generation of experienced administrative public school personnel made superfluous by integration. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.