Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

'Rookie' Users of Antidepressants More Likely to Stop Taking Them

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

'Rookie' Users of Antidepressants More Likely to Stop Taking Them

Article excerpt

ATLANTA -- Patients who are taking antidepressants for the first time are at greatest risk for discontinuing the therapy, Mark Vanelli, M.D., said in a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.

The research shows that patients are most likely to stop drug treatment at the time of their first refill, typically 30-45 days after the initiation of therapy, wrote Dr. Vanelli, chief medical officer of Adheris Inc., a Burlington, Mass., company that provides patient adherence intervention programs.

He and his associates analyzed blinded pharmacy records from 1,157 pharmacies across the country to find patients who filled prescriptions for fluoxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), paroxetine (Paxil CR), venlafaxine (Effexor XR), citalopram (Celexa), or escitalopram (Lexapro). A total of 211,565 patients filled prescriptions for the six antidepressants between Oct. 1, 2003, and March 31, 2004.

Patients were divided into two groups: rookies and veterans. Rookies (37% of the sample) were patients with no prior use of any antidepressant in the 180 days prior to the index fill; veterans (63% of the sample) were defined as patients with a history of antidepressant use in the last 180 days.

Researchers followed the patients for 360 days to calculate the number of days to therapy discontinuation. They also analyzed other factors that might contribute to discontinuation, including age, gender, index refills prescribed, copayments, and estimated income. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.