Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

HPV Infection May Cause Cancerous Cervical Lesions

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

HPV Infection May Cause Cancerous Cervical Lesions

Article excerpt

Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with a much greater risk of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs), researchers say. SILS are cancerous lesions between layers of tissues in the cervix.

Nicolas F. Schlecht, M.Sc., of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and colleagues studied 1,611 women in Sao Paolo, Brazil, to determine the risks of abnormal tissue growth in the cervix before and after infection with HPV. The study took place from November 1993 through March 1997 with follow-up until June 2000.

HPV infection is believed to be the primary cause of cervical cancer. Other studies, according to the authors, have established the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer but have not provided information about cumulative or persistent exposure to cervical HPV infection and the incidence of cancerous cervical lesions.

The women were free of cervical lesions at the beginning of the study and underwent Papanicolaou testing (Pap smears) and HPV testing every four months in the first year of the study and twice yearly thereafter.

The incidence of SILs was 0. …

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