Magazine article Mortgage Banking

Recruiting Trainers

Magazine article Mortgage Banking

Recruiting Trainers

Article excerpt

SUPPOSING THAT YOUR ORGANIZATION has a "real" training department--that is, a career training manager reporting to an executive and managing a group of dedicated, professional trainers. Having gotten this far, you are ahead of many of your competitors.

You will assuredly experience turnover. Probably, or optimally, your turnover will be about 30 percent annually. In a close-to-perfect world, one-third of that turnover will be upward within your organization. Another third will be upward outside your organization. (This is not necessarily bad. For example, if you have one training manager and there is a senior trainer whose next logical move is into management, then he or she has nowhere to go but out. And while you lose a senior trainer, you gain a reputation as an organization that explodes talented people upward into the marketplace.) The final third will be "other." This includes involuntary terminations, lateral moves and people leaving the work force.

One way or another, you will have openings to fill. Ideally, you will go through a thorough, conscientious process of recruiting. This will include internal postings, listings on local and national Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) sites, Internet postings and ads in local and regional periodicals.

Your ideal candidates will have both a knowledge base (mortgage banking) and a skill set (training).

In my experience, it is very unusual to find viable candidates with both the requisite knowledge and skill. Even when a resume shows both, relentless questioning usually discovers that one or the other is largely imaginary. …

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