Magazine article The National Public Accountant

How to Process Words without Taxing Yourself: An Accountant's Guide to Keystroke-Saving Shortcuts

Magazine article The National Public Accountant

How to Process Words without Taxing Yourself: An Accountant's Guide to Keystroke-Saving Shortcuts

Article excerpt

When you drive to work in the morning, you know all the shortcuts, right? Well, wouldn't it make sense in a world where we will pay a premium to save time--e.g. $1.25 for cell phone directory assistance--to know shortcuts to routine word processing and PC tasks? Surprisingly (at least to me), although the lion's share of people in the world use Microsoft Word (sorry, MAC users), few know the most helpful shortcuts to common functions. Ready to learn? Here you go:

Saving an existing document

Do you know the three ways?

1. Go to menu bar at top of screen, click File, then Save. (No shortcut here.)

2. Go to tool bar, click on floppy disk symbol. (Good shortcut.)

3. On keyboard, hit Ctrl (control) key, then "S." (Best shortcut.)

If you already knew number 3, consider yourself about one in a thousand.

Cutting and pasting

Instead of clicking Edit on the menu bar and then Cut, Copy or Paste, use the shortcut keys on your keyboard: Ctrl and "X", "C" or "V," respectively. Most keyboards have those shortcuts written right on the keys. Go ahead, take a look at your keyboard. See the letters on the tops of the keys? (If you don't, take your keyboard back to the store!) Shortcuts are frequently labeled on the front of the keys.

Erasing a sentence

Watching people do this drives me crazy. Ever typed a sentence, realized it made no sense or wasn't relevant and then held down Backspace to erase the whole thing, letter by letter? Try this instead:

* Hold down Ctrl while pushing Backspace and delete one word at a time instead of an agonizingly slow one letter at a time.

* Delete one word too many? No problem. Just hit Ctrl and "Z" to undo it. By the way, if you're more daring, hold Ctrl and Delete and you will delete the words in front of the cursor rather than behind it.

Customizing toolbars

Ever wish the toolbars at the top or bottom of your document could be customized to fit your needs? …

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