Magazine article Guitar Player

Hard Disk Recording, Part 4

Magazine article Guitar Player

Hard Disk Recording, Part 4

Article excerpt

We've examined the nuts and bolts of hard disk recording over the course of the last three columns (Aug. '92, Sept. '92, and Jan. '93). Now we get to the payoff: how you can use this technology to enhance your creativity.

Warp-o-phonics. You can do really strange things to guitar parts with cut, paste, reverse, etc. For example, I took a cool guitar slide and repeated it four times in a bar, once on each beat. It had the mechanical sound of technostyle repetition combined with the organic sound of guitar. Trying to edit while synched to tape is a drag, because you have to edit, roll tape, listen, stop tape, edit some more, roll tape, listen, stop tape, etc. Instead, I record a premix, preferably with a heavily accented kick drum or metronome click, into one channel of Sound Tools while recording the guitar into the other channel. When it's time to edit, I can play back from the hard disk alone and hear the reference premix along with the guitar part.

Fig. 1 shows a victimized--I mean edited--rhythm guitar part. The lower channel is the premix; the spike on each beat from the kick drum provides a handy rhythmic reference for working on the guitar track. Toward the beginning, two beats have been faded in; I pasted in a slide on beats 5 through 7. Some chopped sections add a jarring rhythmic effect.

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Now for some more fun (Fig. 2). Since we don't need the premix any more, let's paste the guitar over it. Here's the twist: We paste the guitar part a beat later and reduce its level. …

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