Magazine article Dance Magazine

Curtain Up

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Curtain Up

Article excerpt

The dance field has long been on the front lines of the gender revolution. Choreographers have been experimenting with gender roles for years, and dancers are going outside of gender stereotypes to get their training. It's no longer unusual to see men wearing skirts and women lifting men. In this issue, we explore the changing perceptions about gender, with our education editor Karen Hildebrand overseeing all the elements.

One theme that came up again and again is the freedom of expression that both women and men feel when expanding gender roles. That's the reason that women like to take men's ballet class (see Chery] Ossola's story "Bold Move") and it's the reason men take on women's roles in a company like Les Ballets Grandiva (see Rachel Straus' story "A Grandiva Diva"). It can be liberating to step outside your gender destiny into a world where anything is possible.

When it comes to the public's perception of gender roles, though, old attitudes die hard. In "Fear of Men in Tights," Kathy Valin finds that there is still, in some quarters, a lingering unease about seeing men in ballet costumes. I say, to those who are afraid of men in tights, give 'em men in tutus. And to the folks who don't want to see women lifting men, I say let them see women lifting women. In "The Feminine Mystique," Ann Murphy writes about four all-female companies who sometimes do just that. However, these groups are not about women taking on men's roles, but about getting beyond gender to something universal.

Although the dance community has embraced broader definitions of gender roles, it has done little to address the gender gap, which, in our field, has more to do with opportunity than money. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.