Magazine article The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)

What Lies Beneath: Lesbian Director Angelina Maccarone Talks about Turning a Female Iranian Refugee into a Male German Factory Worker in Unveiled

Magazine article The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)

What Lies Beneath: Lesbian Director Angelina Maccarone Talks about Turning a Female Iranian Refugee into a Male German Factory Worker in Unveiled

Article excerpt

If you think it's challenging to be a lesbian in the United States, imagine being gay in Iran. Then imagine that you leave that repressive country to seek asylum in Germany--but the country has tightened its immigration policy and won't accept you. So the best solution you come up with is to take on the identity of a dead man.

That's the setup of Unveiled, a stunning new film from German lesbian filmmaker Angelina Maccarone. The lead character, Fariba, played by the riveting Iranian-German actor-musician Jasmin Tabatabai, makes a convincing male protagonist, but it's Fariba's not-so-macho humanity that captures the heart of a woman at the suburban German sauerkraut factory where she works. Sadly, their sweet affair is undone by a jealous loser who can't otherwise compete with his lesbian rival.

For Maccarone, the film's about more than gender and sexual orientation. "What was interesting to us [Maccarone and cowriter-cinematographer Judith Kaufmann] was the subject of identity. We wanted to tell a story about someone who loses basically everything that makes a person a person: her work, where she lives, who her friends are, her family, her language, and her sexual identity."

Maccarone, who is 40 and lives in Berlin, is a child of immigration herself--her father is Italian and her mother German. While studying literature at the University of Hamburg, she was launched into filmmaking after winning an award for a screenplay treatment. She's made two other lesbian-themed movies--including Everything Will Be Fine, an Audience Award winner at Los Angeles's Outfest in 1998--but Maccarone doesn't want her films ghettoized. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.