Magazine article The Futurist

Interracial Baby Boom

Magazine article The Futurist

Interracial Baby Boom

Article excerpt

Ethnic lines blurring in U.S.

During the past 20 years, the number of mixed-race births has increased noticeably in the United States, according to the Population Reference Bureau (PRB). Between 1968 and 1989, children born to parents of different races increased from 1% of total births to 3.4%.

U.S. Census Bureau data show that, mirroring changes in laws and attitudes from 1970 to 1991, the number of mixed-race married couples increased from 310,000 to 994,000. PRB researchers observe that this trend is taking place among all racial and ethnic groups, but the patterns for each group are distinctly different.

"Most mixed births involve one white parent, but by no means all," writes Kalish in PRB's journal, Population Today. "For example, there were nearly 5,000 births in 1989 where one parent was black and the other parent was of another race other than white."

For black and white parents, births increased from 8,700 in 1968 to 45,000 in 1989. …

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