Magazine article Science News

Endurance Cycling Tied to Lasting Heart Damage

Magazine article Science News

Endurance Cycling Tied to Lasting Heart Damage

Article excerpt

People who compete in grueling long-distance bicycle races are in great physical shape. But a study now suggests that the endurance training they undergo could do long-term harm to their hearts.

Researchers in Switzerland located 62 Swiss bicyclers, all men, an average of 38 years after they had competed in the Tour de Suisse race. As a control group, the researchers examined 52 men whose chief exercise for much of their lives had been golf. The researchers took a blood sample from each man and checked for signs of heat trouble. Men in both groups had an average age in the mid-60s and had comparable body weights and blood pressures. Although the former cyclists were exercising slightly more, both groups had similar heart-pumping capacity.

The blood samples revealed that the former cyclists averaged more than twice as much b-type natriuretic peptide, a natural compound that can identify people at risk of heart failure. Eight of the cyclists, but only one of the golfers, had worrisome concentrations of peptide, says cardiologist Christine H. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.