Magazine article Arts & Activities

Editor's Note

Magazine article Arts & Activities

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Come with us and experience the many shades of clay. Whether it's the vibrant pieces created by seventh-graders in "Face Vessels: Original African-American Folk Art" (page 18) or the terra-cotta, black and white figures in "A Story to Remember: Southwest Indian Storytellers" (page 22), colorful clay projects abound in this issue.

An excellent article to motivate your students is our Cover Story, "Learning From Exhibitions: Shades of Clay" (page 24). This exhibit is a "Multi-Cultural Look at Contemporary Clay," and demonstrates how artists are inspired or influenced--directly or intuitively--by culture and ethnicity. Works by artists who are African-American, Afro-Cuban, Thai, Chinese, Moorish, Chicano, Latino, American Indian and Cuban are featured. Clay remains one of the most accessible materials throughout the world, and is still a significant part of most of our lives.

"A Dinner Party of Their Own: Tribute to Judy Chicago" (page 20) is a project high-school students will get into. After learning about the women represented in and the message of Chicago's often controversial work, "The Dinner Party," students were ready and able to make their own statements in what they called "autobiographical plates." (Note: If all goes as planned, in March 2007 The Brooklyn Museum will become home to the permanent installation of Judy Chicago's "The Dinner Party," made possible through a generous gift from Museum Trustee, Dr. Elizabeth A. Sackler.)

Art ideas for all levels also abound in this issue. "Digitally Romare" (page 32) is a wonderful way to celebrate Black History Month. …

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