Magazine article Joint Force Quarterly

Battlespace Management in Integrated Operations

Magazine article Joint Force Quarterly

Battlespace Management in Integrated Operations

Article excerpt

President George W. Bush defined the modern battlefield in his January 20, 2005, inaugural address:

We are led, by events and common sense, to one conclusion: The survival of liberty in our land increasingly depends on the success of liberty in other lands. The best hope for peace in our world is the expansion of freedom in all the world.

Indeed, although there are friends of freedom across the world, America still has a security dilemma: a dauntingly large battlefield. The repressive and borderless alliance of terrorists and rogue states, the nontraditional nature of modern asymmetric warfare, and the potential for a few to use technology to create devastating, worldwide effects mean the President and other decisionmakers in the free world are faced with an increasingly global battlespace and a military toolchest primarily developed in the Cold War. Fortunately, America and its allies are also exploiting modern technology, developing new partnerships, and creating innovative ways of managing this complex battlespace, one that covers all mediums, including cyberspace and what used to be called "outer space."

The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff further defined the threat, explained the new strategic battlespace, and called for increasingly integrated operations. In late 2004, General Richard B. Myers remarked at the Economic Club of Indianapolis:

It is a very different war than we've fought in the past, against a very different kind of adversary or enemy, an enemy that really knows no limits. …

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