Magazine article Black Enterprise

A Recipe for Success: Restaurateur Blends Business and Community Service

Magazine article Black Enterprise

A Recipe for Success: Restaurateur Blends Business and Community Service

Article excerpt

Hecky Powell, suburban Chicago's barbecue king, has gained as much renown for his finger-licking meals as he has for his ability to reach at-risk youth. He learned the main ingredient--hard work--from his father, Forrest E. Powell Sr., a domestic worker, landscaper, and lab technician. "He raised nine children and bought a house, and this was before you had first-time home buyers' programs," the 57-year-old restaurateur says. "He always told me 'Whatever you are, be the best at it.'"

Powell carried this message of industry and humility with him into the workforce. But during his 10-year stint as executive director of the Community Economic Development Association, he became disillusioned. "As far as I was concerned, we weren't helping a lot of people," he reflects. "We were just doing hand-me-out kind of programs, which became entitlement programs."

He found a viable alternative in entrepreneurship, opening Hecky's Barbecue in 1983 and made youth job training the heart of the restaurant's mission. To date, Powell has hired more than 200 young people. Many were referred to him by the Youth Job Center of Evanston, an organization serving young people who face major employment hurdles because of homelessness, criminal records, and poor education. In the interviewing process, Powell doesn't weed out applicants based on their appearance, speech, or experience. His main criterion: a willingness to work From chopping rib tips to operating the cash register, his young hires learn promptness and professionalism. …

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