Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Letters

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Letters

Article excerpt

IN WAR, TRUTH IS OFTEN UGLY

I don't find anything heroic in Tom Lasseter's reporting ("Pressing Issues," March E&P, p. 19). His piece from Samarra was a smear piece of real heroes. He used the names of the individual soldiers, and even mentioned where they were from. It is obvious that Mr. Lasseter won the confidence of these brave men and then wrote a political piece, using their names and homes, that purposely made them look ignorant and brutish.

I am sure that Michael Penas' family enjoyed reading about him gutting an Iraqi with a 50-caliber machine gun. I am sure that Sgt. Powell's family enjoyed reading about him shooting someone in the face with a shotgun, and even worse is that terrorists can read too.

No one pretends that war is anything but profoundly ugly and everyone has a right to his opinion, but Mr. Lasseter smeared brave men who stand in the way of those who would immediately rescind freedom of the press and many other of the freedoms that we take for granted. His use of these heroes for political purposes is despicable, and I would classify him as neither a gentleman nor a patriot.

ROBERT WEST

Tomball, Texas

THERE IS NO CIVIL WAR IN IRAQ

I note glaringly that no one in Iraq is claiming credit for the increased violence. Therefore it must be coming from without and being done by foreign mercenaries in an attempt to ignite a civil war.

The Iraqis, including both Sunni and Shia, are well aware of this -- and are demonstrating against it together in parts of Iraq. So every article I read in the U.S. media about current violence in Iraq appears to be approximately 99% lies and not much else.

Journalists are being killed in Iraq by mercenaries in order to shut them up in an effort to obfuscate the Truth in Iraq. The result is that U.S. news articles are full of nothing but lies.

TOM LOWE

Borego Springs, Calif.

LONG ARM OF THE LAW PRESS

The March issue editorial in E&P said the following about a libel case involving the chief judge of the Illinois Supreme Court: "The state's press should start paying far closer attention to this mischievous lawsuit."

The Chicago Daily Law Bulletin has written eight stories about the case dating back to June of 2004. …

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