Magazine article Security Management

Security Works: Scrambled Security

Magazine article Security Management

Security Works: Scrambled Security

Article excerpt

In retail outlets, it is a common practice for the employees to leave the lock set on the last digit of the combination so they can easily access the safe throughout the day without redialing the lock. But day locking, as this practice is called, is not only convenient for employees, it is convenient for thieves.

Eckerd Drug Company, which is headquartered in Clearwater, Florida, wanted to make the safes in its stores harder to access. Two years ago, the drugstore chain started installing safes equipped with the Scrambler lock into all its new stores. Approximately seventy of the chain's 1,650 stores are now equipped with the locks, and Michael Carter, the company's director of loss prevention, says they have helped reduce theft. "The likelihood of an unknown [person] just going into the safe is nonexistant," he adds.

The Scrambler, made by Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc., of Nicholasville, Kentucky is different than ordinary mechanical, three-wheel combination locks because it automatically repositions, or scrambles, the lock's wheels the instant the lock's bolt is retracted. …

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