Magazine article Guitar Player

Lead Guitar 101: Wrenching Triple-String Oblique Bends

Magazine article Guitar Player

Lead Guitar 101: Wrenching Triple-String Oblique Bends

Article excerpt

We tackled the double-string oblique bend in our previous Lead Guitar 101 ("Get a Grip on Two-String Oblique Bends," April '05). Now it's time to take on its triple-string sibling. First, a quick refresher: In a typical oblique bend, you sustain one or two notes on high strings while bending another note on a lower string. You can pluck the high and low tones simultaneously or one after the other, and the bend can be virtually instantaneous or change pitch in rhythm. It takes a lot of practice to master this technique, but it's worth it. When you lay down a righteous oblique bend, people take notice.

Played with a snarling attack and slightly gritty tone, Ex. 1 conjures Roy Buchanan, as well as Mick Taylor in the Sticky Fingers-era Rolling Stones (check out the jam in "Can't You Hear Me Knocking"). The oblique bend happens in bar 1, beginning with a third string, whole-step stretch (beat one) that you hold while plucking notes on the first and second strings. …

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