Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Depression and Diabetes

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Depression and Diabetes

Article excerpt

Depression is common in patients with diabetes and may require long-term treatment, a recent study shows.

The study found that depressed, diabetic patients who responded to treatment with sertraline (Zoloft) were much less likely to have a relapse of depression if they continued the drug than if they did not.

In 79 patients who continued sertraline after an initial, successful, 16-week treatment period, the time until one-third of patients had a relapse was 226 days. That compared with 57 days in 73 patients who responded during the 16-week phase of treatment but were assigned to placebo during continuation, reported Patrick J. Lustman, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry at Washington University, St. Louis, and his colleagues (Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 2006;63:521-9).

One in four patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes experiences clinical depression, and in a previous, small study of 25 patients, fewer than 40% of those successfully treated for depression remained depression free in the year after that treatment. And depression negatively affects glycemic control, Dr. Lustman noted in the report.

The study was conducted by enrolling 351 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and clinical depression, who were treated with open-label sertraline at a starting dose of 50 mg/day, titrated up to a maximum of 200 mg/day. …

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