Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Article excerpt

Being an African American in America is a risk factor in and of itself, not because of any inherent risk, but because you are going to be held more accountable for your behavior than your European American counterparts.

In his report on youth violence, former Surgeon General David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D., documented 20 years of research showing that, in their youth, European American males perpetrate just as much violence as African American males. Yet, who winds up in correctional facilities? African American youth.

One reason for this is the pervasive stereotype that all African Americans are more violent than European Americans (not true). Another reason is that when you are a poor youth and you grow up in a poor community, the likelihood is greater that a paucity of protective factors will exist in your community.

Risk factors for youth violence are not predictive factors. Often, the presence of risk factors causes poor African American youth to be unfairly demonized as dangerous, without any consideration of the protective factors that may or may not exist in those youths' lives.

Interventions that build up protective factors can minimize the impact of risk factors. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.