Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

In Study, Most Adolescent Suicide Attempts Were Rash and Emotional, Not Premeditated

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

In Study, Most Adolescent Suicide Attempts Were Rash and Emotional, Not Premeditated

Article excerpt

SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. -- Only 4% of 164 adolescents who tried to kill themselves left a suicide note, according to a retrospective, single-institution study reported at the annual meeting of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

"This situational profile points toward rash, emotionally charged attempts, marked by a sense of immediacy," the researchers concluded in a poster presented by Kelly Fiore, a fourth-year medical student at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J.

Because few suicide attempts appeared to be premeditated, Ms. Fiore and her coinvestigators from the department of psychiatry recommended that interventions for teenagers address impulsivity.

Along with programs offering "behavioral strategies for affect management and impulse control," Ms. Fiore wrote that youngsters in high-risk groups should be made aware of emergency hotlines, drop-in centers, and other crisis resources.

The investigators reviewed charts of all adolescents admitted to a tertiary care center after confirmed suicide attempts during a 46-month period.

The adolescents ranged in age from 10 to 18 years (median 15 years) and came from a diverse population (59% white, 22% Hispanic, 16% black, 3% other). Most attended school and lived at home, which was described in nearly all cases as "conflictual."

More than two-thirds (69%) had mood disorders. Nearly half (45%) had made a previous suicide attempt.

Overdose was the predominant method, used in 81% of attempts. Cutting was the next most common method (14%), followed by hanging, multiple methods, jumping from a height, and carbon monoxide exposure.

The leading agents for overdose were prescription drugs (24%), acetaminophen (22%), and aspirin (15%). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.