Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Article excerpt

People who have chronic pain are extraordinarily clear about the devastating impact this problem has on their psychological balance. The resulting sense of helplessness often generates a great deal of grief, depression, stress, pessimism, and loneliness.

People who have never experienced severe, chronic pain, however, have no idea how disruptive it can be. Because of this, they may erroneously assume (and even suggest) that the pain is purely psychological or a sign of weakness of character or will--sentiments that further isolate and alienate the sufferers.

This isolation is exacerbated by the current health care culture. Although some understanding exists of the medical conundrum of pain, the psychiatric ramifications are very much an afterthought. The proactive approach of considering mind and body takes a back seat to the mechanistic approach of trying to heal the physical body while ignoring the mind.

This approach is rather typical of Western medicine and has its origins as far back as the Descartes doctrine of the distinction between the mind and body.

Because Western medicine focuses so intently on the mechanistic view of life and well-being, we don't have evidence of the efficacy of other, more esoteric forms of healing, such as acupuncture, meditation, prayer, and support group activities. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.